Feb
8

Dennis Stevens is talking on “Feeding the Agile Beast“.

Kanban is being used by agile development teams to produce software faster and with higher quality than ever before. While agile works for small teams achieving these same benefits at the enterprise level has failed. Agile’s delivery cadence drives transparency which compels learning and adaptation. Within small teams, this learning and adaptation happens in real time. At scale, the adaptation and learning happens at different times resulting in a kind of intellectual version control problem that corrupts progress across teams.

Business capability analysis supports the cadence of agile development and has proven an effective control mechanism for these larger teams. This helps larger teams realize similar speed and quality results of smaller teams while remaining aligned with what is most valuable to the business.

Dennis Stevens has been helping organizations improve economic outcomes through improved technology alignment and software development since the mid-1980’s. Starting in 2000 he has been focused on developing business analysis and project management methods that leverage the incremental and iterative cadence of Lean and Agile delivery. His approach to capability analysis was the basis for Microsoft’s Business Architecture methodology, was published in Harvard Business Review in June 2008, and has contributed to improved performance in dozens of projects delivering over $200 million in value. Dennis has been certified as a Project Management Professional, in Lean Value Stream mapping, as an OPM3 Certified Consultant and a Certified Scrum Master. Dennis originally attended Florida State University on a violin scholarship and eventually earned his degree in Organizational Psychology and Development. He served as a US Marine during Desert Storm and earned a Naval Commendation Medal during Operation Fiery Vigil in the Philippines.

Feb
8

Ken Pugh is speaking on “Determining Business Value“.

Lean focuses on delivering business value to the customers as rapidly as possible. On agile projects, story points are often used to estimate development effort . However to concentrate on delivering business value, we must be able to place a business value on user stories. Through lecture and interactive exercises, Ken Pugh explains how to estimate and track business value. He presents two methods for quickly estimating business value for features and stories. He shows the relationships between business values and story points and how to chart business value for progress tracking. By the end, you’ll be able to use business value to focus both the customers and the developers on the most important requirements.

Ken Pugh (ken.pugh@netobjectives.com) is a fellow consultant with Net Objectives. He helps companies transform into agile practices through training and coaching. His particular interests are in communication (particularly communicating requirements), delivering business value, and using lean principles to deliver high quality quickly. He also trains, mentors, and testifies on technology topics ranging from object-oriented analysis to embedded systems. He is author of several books, including the 2006 Jolt Award winner Prefactoring and an upcoming book, Lean-Agile Acceptance Test Driven Development.He has presented at numerous national conferences, including Software Development, Best Practices, Better Software, Agile Development Practices, and AgileAlliance.

Feb
8

Just added:

John Goodsen will talk about “What’s Next for Electronic Kanban? Encouraging Innovation in Electronic Kanban Tools“.

In the last few years, the notion of Kanban for Software Development has become the latest rage in Agile evolution. During this time, I’ve been experimenting with collaborative web tools for distributed kanban teams, resulting in radtrack, an open source kanban web application. As I learned kanban and used radtrack as my coding dojo along the way, I’ve basically re-written it from scratch twice as I wrestled with how iterations might fit into a Kanban world. The end result is that I’ve come to accept that iterations in product development introduce significant waste, both in tool complexity and associated process complexity. This interactive presentation/workshop will take particpants through a very brief history of kanban tools and then request your involvement in an interactive brainstorming session on what the future of kanban tools might bring.

The focus of this interactive session will be more of a paper prototyping, workshop format, designed to elicit new visualizations from kanban visionaries on new ways to visualize and encourage lean team concepts across geographic boundaries with electronic kanban tools. Participants will be asked to break into focus groups and help brainstorm directions for the next generation of electronic kanban systems. I expect to write up the results of these brainstorming sessions as a joint activity with all workshop participants and publish the results as a mechanism to stimulate new electronic kanban tool innovations with both commercial and open source tool vendors alike.

Feb
5

Just added:

Chris Shinkle will talk about “Lean and Kanban in a Contracting Environment“.

Kanban practitioners commonly ask two questions: “How can I reliably commit to a date using Kanban?” and “Is there a lack of perceived schedule pressure in Kanban?” People in contracting or service environments must often make commitments to clients with specific delivery dates and cost estimates. We will explore how to make target-driven commitments when managing projects with Lean principles. In addition, we will look at ways to utilize those initial estimates to appropriately set team expectations. The session will show how this encourages innovation within the team leading to process improvements. At the same time providing leading indicators of project status without willfully holding to an unrealistic goal.

Chris Shinkle is a Development Manager at Software Engineering Professionals™ (SEP). SEP provides software services and systems in a variety of industries including products for business, data and safety critical applications.
Chris has worked with SEP for over 13 years in roles ranging from software engineer to recruiter to development manager. He has experience customizing and fitting process models to many different domains including aerospace, defense, medical, consumer electronics, and automotive. He has used Agile and Lean methods to lead large complex projects, most notably, a military aircraft engine monitoring and maintenance system and an FDA regulated remote patient monitoring system. He introduced FDD to SEP in 2004, and then continued to evolve the internal processes and approaches over the following years. More than 12 projects at SEP have successfully used pull-based approaches.
Chris is a graduate of Purdue University and resides in Indianapolis with his wife and two sons.
Blog: www.sep.com/cmshinkle
Twitter: cmshinkle
Email: cmshinkle@sep.com
Website: www.sep.com